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Arthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis and occurs most often in older people. It is also called degenerative joint disease or osteoarthrosis. OA mostly affects cartilage, the hard but slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones where they meet to form a joint. Healthy cartilage allows bones to glide over one another and absorbs energy from the shock of physical movement.

In osteoarthritis, the surface layer of cartilage breaks and wears away. This allows bones under the cartilage to rub together, causing pain, swelling, and loss of motion of the joint. Over time, this can cause the joint to lose its normal shape.

The body replaces damaged joint tissue with scar tissue. Scar tissue is a tight, fibrous network of tissue that does not move or stretch easily. Also, small deposits of bone—called osteophytes or bone spurs—may grow on the edges of the joint. These bone spurs are actually calcified scar tissue. Bits of bone or cartilage can also break off and float inside the joint space. This causes more pain and damage.

People with osteoarthritis usually experience joint pain and stiffness. The most commonly affected joints are those at the ends of the fingers (closest to the nail), thumbs, neck, lower back, knees, and hips.

For most people, joint damage develops gradually over years. In some people, osteoarthritis is relatively mild and interferes little with day-to-day life; in others, it causes significant pain and disability.

According to the Annals of Internal Medicine, 73% of people with arthritis who sought out chiropractic care found it helpful. Our treatment options go beyond standard chiropractic methods to include advanced therapies, such as High Intensity Laser Therapy. Using a combination of traditional and advanced methods, our patients report fantastic outcomes.